Lyall


  1. heartandsoulmidwifery:

    What do you use for umbilical cord stump care?

    Alcohol, chlorhexidine, triple dye, nothing?

    I’m really interested.

    The tertiary hospital protocols used by other public hospitals statewide says to use a cotton bud (not cotton wool) moistened with tap water. Here is a link to the protocol which includes references: http://kemh.health.wa.gov.au/development/manuals/O&G_guidelines/sectionb/10/b10.2.4.pdf 

    Other guidelines can be accessed here: http://kemh.health.wa.gov.au/development/manuals/O&G_guidelines/sectionb/index.htm#6

  2. zerostatereflex:

    Fertilization

    A beautifully done animation on how you became you.

    See the full video here as I left out some really cool parts.

    From 300 or so million down to ONE.

    YOU. MADE. IT.

    (via heartandsoulmidwifery)

  3. special-snowflake-hall-of-fame:

    wangpatang:

    freshprinceofaltair:

    wangpatang:

    talking-fedora:

    jongod:

    EVEN GOOGLE CHROME KNOWS THAT MISANDRY ISN’T FUCKING REAL

    Your URL has a red line under it too. Do you not exist?

    image

    whoa

    image

    whOA

    image

    !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    cis people confirmed to not exist

    image

    the evidence just keeps piling up

    image

    The patriarchy is crumbling before our eyes.

    (via 64bitwar)

  4. v0tum:

    You’re over someone when you stop looking at their social media accounts.

    (via loveelustsex)

  5. chainsawnicorn:

I know I don’t have all of them. Shh.

    chainsawnicorn:

    I know I don’t have all of them. Shh.

    (via chainsawnicorn)

  6. lostgeraldton:

Not forgetting the good old Swan Gold either of course. http://ift.tt/1c5UBuO

    lostgeraldton:

    Not forgetting the good old Swan Gold either of course. http://ift.tt/1c5UBuO

  7. Waits for ‘likes’ from ‘friends’.

    Waits for ‘likes’ from ‘friends’.

  8. flamingno:

    people without passwords on their phones are the strongest and most terrifying people you will ever meet

    I don’t have a screen lock password on my mobile phone.

    (via hedgeworth)

  9. thedarksideofparis:

A Book For Little White Girls

    thedarksideofparis:

    A Book For Little White Girls

    (via hedgeworth)

  10. biomedicalephemera:


Important People of Medicine: Virginia Apgar
If you’ve ever had, or been around a baby that was born in a hospital, Dr. Apgar’s name probably sounds familiar. An anesthesiologist and teratologist (one who studies abnormalities of physical development), Virginia Apgar is most well-known for the "Apgar score" - a rating given to infants at 1 and 5 minutes after birth, which is often a determining factor in whether or not the baby needs to remain in the hospital after birth.
Dr. Apgar was the first female doctor to receive professorship at Columbia University medical school, and her work in teratology during the rubella pandemic of 1964-65 led to her outspoken advocacy for universal vaccination against that disease. Though it’s often mild and annoying above all else in healthy people, when pregnant women contract rubella (also known as German measles), the rate of deformity and disability of their children skyrockets. It can even cause miscarriage.
Virginia Apgar also promoted universal Rh-testing among pregnant women. This test shows whether a woman has a different Rh blood type than her fetus, because if she does, she can develop antibodies that can cross the placenta and destroy fetal blood cells. This can cause fetal hydrops and high levels of neonatal mortality, but can be prevented by administering anti-RhD IgG injections to the mother during pregnancy, so that she does not develop a sensitivity (and subsequent antibodies) to her baby’s blood type.
Though Dr. Apgar never married or had children of her own, she saved the lives of countless babies and streamlined many medical considerations of neonatal care, resulting in more effective medical treatment. She studied and promoted the prevention of premature births and causes of fetal deformity. She worked for March of Dimes and taught thousands of students. Her influence in the obstetrics and neonatology fields cannot be overstated.

    biomedicalephemera:

    Important People of Medicine: Virginia Apgar

    If you’ve ever had, or been around a baby that was born in a hospital, Dr. Apgar’s name probably sounds familiar. An anesthesiologist and teratologist (one who studies abnormalities of physical development), Virginia Apgar is most well-known for the "Apgar score" - a rating given to infants at 1 and 5 minutes after birth, which is often a determining factor in whether or not the baby needs to remain in the hospital after birth.

    Dr. Apgar was the first female doctor to receive professorship at Columbia University medical school, and her work in teratology during the rubella pandemic of 1964-65 led to her outspoken advocacy for universal vaccination against that disease. Though it’s often mild and annoying above all else in healthy people, when pregnant women contract rubella (also known as German measles), the rate of deformity and disability of their children skyrockets. It can even cause miscarriage.

    Virginia Apgar also promoted universal Rh-testing among pregnant women. This test shows whether a woman has a different Rh blood type than her fetus, because if she does, she can develop antibodies that can cross the placenta and destroy fetal blood cells. This can cause fetal hydrops and high levels of neonatal mortality, but can be prevented by administering anti-RhD IgG injections to the mother during pregnancy, so that she does not develop a sensitivity (and subsequent antibodies) to her baby’s blood type.

    Though Dr. Apgar never married or had children of her own, she saved the lives of countless babies and streamlined many medical considerations of neonatal care, resulting in more effective medical treatment. She studied and promoted the prevention of premature births and causes of fetal deformity. She worked for March of Dimes and taught thousands of students. Her influence in the obstetrics and neonatology fields cannot be overstated.

    (via redcloud)

  11. No I am not going to ‘Like’ Facebook on Facebook and I’m not falling for your transparent attempt at evoking a sense of wanderlust associated with an emotional connection to your brand lulling me into thinking I really could be having carefree adventures featuring spontaneous swamp romps with my new young attractive bikini clad women friends whom I will stay connected with and share interactions on Facebook all the while my existing friends back home stay socially connected to me according to the whims of the cyber-omniscient algorithm. 

And one other thing: 

WHY WOULD YOU SPLASH AROUND IN SWAMP REEDS? THAT IS JUST ASKING TO GET BITTEN BY A TIGER SNAKE.

    No I am not going to ‘Like’ Facebook on Facebook and I’m not falling for your transparent attempt at evoking a sense of wanderlust associated with an emotional connection to your brand lulling me into thinking I really could be having carefree adventures featuring spontaneous swamp romps with my new young attractive bikini clad women friends whom I will stay connected with and share interactions on Facebook all the while my existing friends back home stay socially connected to me according to the whims of the cyber-omniscient algorithm.

    And one other thing:

    WHY WOULD YOU SPLASH AROUND IN SWAMP REEDS? THAT IS JUST ASKING TO GET BITTEN BY A TIGER SNAKE.

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