Lyall


  1. Waits for ‘likes’ from ‘friends’.

    Waits for ‘likes’ from ‘friends’.

  2. flamingno:

    people without passwords on their phones are the strongest and most terrifying people you will ever meet

    I don’t have a screen lock password on my mobile phone.

    (via hedgeworth)

  3. thedarksideofparis:

A Book For Little White Girls

    thedarksideofparis:

    A Book For Little White Girls

    (via hedgeworth)

  4. biomedicalephemera:


Important People of Medicine: Virginia Apgar
If you’ve ever had, or been around a baby that was born in a hospital, Dr. Apgar’s name probably sounds familiar. An anesthesiologist and teratologist (one who studies abnormalities of physical development), Virginia Apgar is most well-known for the "Apgar score" - a rating given to infants at 1 and 5 minutes after birth, which is often a determining factor in whether or not the baby needs to remain in the hospital after birth.
Dr. Apgar was the first female doctor to receive professorship at Columbia University medical school, and her work in teratology during the rubella pandemic of 1964-65 led to her outspoken advocacy for universal vaccination against that disease. Though it’s often mild and annoying above all else in healthy people, when pregnant women contract rubella (also known as German measles), the rate of deformity and disability of their children skyrockets. It can even cause miscarriage.
Virginia Apgar also promoted universal Rh-testing among pregnant women. This test shows whether a woman has a different Rh blood type than her fetus, because if she does, she can develop antibodies that can cross the placenta and destroy fetal blood cells. This can cause fetal hydrops and high levels of neonatal mortality, but can be prevented by administering anti-RhD IgG injections to the mother during pregnancy, so that she does not develop a sensitivity (and subsequent antibodies) to her baby’s blood type.
Though Dr. Apgar never married or had children of her own, she saved the lives of countless babies and streamlined many medical considerations of neonatal care, resulting in more effective medical treatment. She studied and promoted the prevention of premature births and causes of fetal deformity. She worked for March of Dimes and taught thousands of students. Her influence in the obstetrics and neonatology fields cannot be overstated.

    biomedicalephemera:

    Important People of Medicine: Virginia Apgar

    If you’ve ever had, or been around a baby that was born in a hospital, Dr. Apgar’s name probably sounds familiar. An anesthesiologist and teratologist (one who studies abnormalities of physical development), Virginia Apgar is most well-known for the "Apgar score" - a rating given to infants at 1 and 5 minutes after birth, which is often a determining factor in whether or not the baby needs to remain in the hospital after birth.

    Dr. Apgar was the first female doctor to receive professorship at Columbia University medical school, and her work in teratology during the rubella pandemic of 1964-65 led to her outspoken advocacy for universal vaccination against that disease. Though it’s often mild and annoying above all else in healthy people, when pregnant women contract rubella (also known as German measles), the rate of deformity and disability of their children skyrockets. It can even cause miscarriage.

    Virginia Apgar also promoted universal Rh-testing among pregnant women. This test shows whether a woman has a different Rh blood type than her fetus, because if she does, she can develop antibodies that can cross the placenta and destroy fetal blood cells. This can cause fetal hydrops and high levels of neonatal mortality, but can be prevented by administering anti-RhD IgG injections to the mother during pregnancy, so that she does not develop a sensitivity (and subsequent antibodies) to her baby’s blood type.

    Though Dr. Apgar never married or had children of her own, she saved the lives of countless babies and streamlined many medical considerations of neonatal care, resulting in more effective medical treatment. She studied and promoted the prevention of premature births and causes of fetal deformity. She worked for March of Dimes and taught thousands of students. Her influence in the obstetrics and neonatology fields cannot be overstated.

    (via redcloud)

  5. No I am not going to ‘Like’ Facebook on Facebook and I’m not falling for your transparent attempt at evoking a sense of wanderlust associated with an emotional connection to your brand lulling me into thinking I really could be having carefree adventures featuring spontaneous swamp romps with my new young attractive bikini clad women friends whom I will stay connected with and share interactions on Facebook all the while my existing friends back home stay socially connected to me according to the whims of the cyber-omniscient algorithm. 

And one other thing: 

WHY WOULD YOU SPLASH AROUND IN SWAMP REEDS? THAT IS JUST ASKING TO GET BITTEN BY A TIGER SNAKE.

    No I am not going to ‘Like’ Facebook on Facebook and I’m not falling for your transparent attempt at evoking a sense of wanderlust associated with an emotional connection to your brand lulling me into thinking I really could be having carefree adventures featuring spontaneous swamp romps with my new young attractive bikini clad women friends whom I will stay connected with and share interactions on Facebook all the while my existing friends back home stay socially connected to me according to the whims of the cyber-omniscient algorithm.

    And one other thing:

    WHY WOULD YOU SPLASH AROUND IN SWAMP REEDS? THAT IS JUST ASKING TO GET BITTEN BY A TIGER SNAKE.

  6. costumefilms:

Cleopatra - extras on the set, wearing bikinis, thong sandals, “winged” headpieces and matching stoles.

    costumefilms:

    Cleopatra - extras on the set, wearing bikinis, thong sandals, “winged” headpieces and matching stoles.

    (via reckon)

  7. lucknoww:

    submariet:

    VAN EYCK

    Hahahah

  8. Curiosity is insubordination in its purest form.
    Vladimir Nabakov { as quoted in Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran (2003) } (via viperslang)

    (via somuchundone)

  9. The surname of John Furphy, manufacturer of water-carts in Shepparton, was first used as a synonym for ‘rumour’ in the Australian Army camp at Broadmeadows, outside Melbourne, in September or October 1914 (Letters, 18 December 2003). Rumour was rife among the soldiers when the embarkation of the Australian Imperial Force to fight in World War One was suddenly postponed, and transports that had already sailed from Queensland were held at Melbourne. Press censorship prevented any public explanation of the cause of the delay – fear of German battleships in the Indian Ocean. ‘Furphy’ indicated the location from which the rumours came: either from the drivers of the carts or from soldiers gathered around to collect water. John Furphy had so successfully branded his product – ‘Furphy’ appeared in large block capitals on the side of the tank, and the cast-iron ends bore details of the firm and its products, as well as the improving text ‘Good better best/Never let it rest/Till your good is better/And your better best’ – that all water-carts tended to be known as ‘Furphies’, at least in Victoria. (Later generations added their own messages, the last being ‘Towards an Australian Republic’.)
    John Barnes
    La Trobe University, Melbourne via http://www.lrb.co.uk/v26/n01/letters
  10. Lung Auscultation | Now@NEJM
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